Friday, October 2, 2009

Tax Dispute Settlement: Offer In Compromise

There are several ways to settle with and/or stop the IRS from issuing garnishments and levies. One of the more popular strategies is applying for 'Offer In Compromise'.

See Currently Not Collectible Article.

An offer in compromise (OIC) is an agreement with the IRS that settles the taxpayer’s tax liabilities for less than the full amount owed. As a general rule, the IRS will not accept the offer if they believe that the liability can be paid in full as a lump sum or through a payment agreement.

Generally, the IRS will not accept an OIC unless the amount offered by the taxpayer is equal to or greater than the 'reasonable collection potential' (RCP). The RCP is how the IRS measures the taxpayer’s ability to pay and includes the value that can be realized from the taxpayer’s assets. The RCP also includes anticipated future income, less certain amounts allowed for basic living expenses.

Three Types of OICs


1. Doubt as to Collectibility
- Doubt exists that the taxpayer could ever pay the full amount of tax liability owed within the remainder of the statutory period for collection.

2. Doubt as to Liability
- A legitimate doubt exists that the assessed tax liability is correct. Possible reasons to submit a doubt as to liability offer include: (1) the examiner made a mistake interpreting the law, (2) the examiner failed to consider the taxpayer’s evidence or (3) the taxpayer has new evidence.

3. Effective Tax Administration - There is no doubt that the tax is correct and there is potential to collect the full amount of the tax owed, but an exceptional circumstance exists. To be eligible for this type of compromise, a taxpayer must demonstrate that the collection of the tax would create an economic hardship or would be unfair and inequitable.


OIC Payment Options

In general, a taxpayer must submit a $150 application fee and initial payment along with the Form 656 Offer in Compromise. Taxpayers may chose to pay their offer in compromise in one of three payment options:

1. Lump Sum Cash Offer - Payable in non-refundable installments, the offer amount must be paid in five or fewer installments upon written notice of acceptance. A non-refundable payment of 20 percent of the offer amount along with the $150 application fee is due upon filing the Form 656.

If the offer will be paid in 5 or fewer installments in 5 months or less, the offer amount must include the realizable value of assets plus the amount that could be collected over 48 months of payments or the time remaining on the statute, whichever is less.

If the offer will be paid in 5 or fewer installments in more than 5 months and within 24 months, the offer amount must include the realizable value of assets plus the amount that could be collected over 60 months of payments, or the time remaining on the statute, whichever is less.

If the offer will be paid in 5 or fewer installments in more than 24 months, the offer amount must include the realizable value of assets plus the amount that could be collected over the time remaining on the statute.

2. Short Term Periodic Payment Offer - Payable in non-refundable installments; the offer amount must be paid within 24 months of the date the IRS received the offer. The first payment and the $150 application fee are due upon filing the Form 656. Regular payments must be made during the offer investigation.

The offer amount must include the realizable value of assets plus the total amount the IRS could collect over 60 months of payments or the remainder of the statutory period for collection, whichever is less.

3. Deferred Periodic Payment Offer - Payable in non-refundable installments; the offer amount must be paid over the remaining statutory period for collecting the tax. The first payment and the $150 application fee are due upon filing the Form 656. Regular payments must be made during the investigation.

The offer amount must include the realizable value of assets plus the total amount the IRS could collect through monthly payments during the remaining life of the statutory period for collection.

The IRS is not bound by either the offer amount or the terms proposed by the taxpayer. The OIC investigator may negotiate a different offer amount and terms, when appropriate. The investigator may determine that the proposed offer amount is too low or the payment terms are too protracted to recommend acceptance. In this situation, the OIC investigator may advise the taxpayer as to what larger amount or different terms would likely be recommended for acceptance.

For more information on how to submit an Offer in Compromise with the IRS, consider consulting an experienced Washington Tax Attorney.

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